The South Korean government is currently promoting Christmas carols on billboards around the country. However, some Buddhists have taken offense to this and are calling for a boycott against Christmas in response.

The “South Korean Buddhists object to government’s promotion of Christmas carols” is a news story about the South Korean government’s decision to promote Christmas carols.

South Korean Buddhists object to government’s promotion of Christmas carols

South-Korean-Buddhists-object-to-governments-promotion-of-Christmas-carols

 

Buddhists in South Korea are protesting a government-funded initiative to promote Christmas music. According to the Korea Times, the Association of Korean Buddhist Orders has taken the Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism to court to prevent it from using public funding to promote Christmas music.

Support from the government for “a Christian missionary endeavor”

According to The Korea Herald, the ministry began the campaign in collaboration with the National Council of Churches in Korea, the United Christian Churches of Korea, and the Catholic Archdiocese of Seoul. According to The Korea Times, the government “is spearheading a Christian missionary initiative,” according to a statement from the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism.

The statement, according to the Telegraph, said that playing Christmas songs all year was “a lethal weapon and… little more than pollution.” According to the newspaper, the Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism has said that it would spend one billion Korean won to promote the broadcast of Christmas music on radio stations and in public venues like as shopping malls.

Many individuals in South Korea have complained that the Christmas season is getting less joyous, according to the Korean Times. According to the newspaper, this emotion was likely sparked by a new copyright rule requiring fees to be paid for music played in big commercial places, which had made it more difficult to hear Christmas music in public.

The Korea Music Copyright Association is currently promoting 22 free Christmas tunes, according to the media.

🎄 According to a Buddhist organization in South Korea that is suing the government to prohibit the government from subsidizing the playing of Christmas carols https://t.co/5ma4gxpQZe, the songs are “a dangerous weapon.”

— December 4, 2021, Telegraph World News (@TelegraphWorld)

According to the Korea Herald, prominent radio stations around the nation are anticipated to broadcast Christmas music in the days leading up to the holiday.

On Eunomia, you may discuss this news.

According to the newspaper, Cardinal Andrew Yeom Soo-Jung, the recently retired Catholic archbishop of Seoul, was the one who initially proposed the Christmas music promotion.

More claims of discrimination have been made.

According to the article, the Jogye Order protested that the Christmas carol campaign was simply one of several discriminatory tactics carried out by different government entities in favor of Christians.

Another example of pro-Christian partiality, according to the group, is a government-backed proposal for a national Catholic pilgrimage route that passes through two Buddhist temples.

According to the publication, the Buddhist group claims that around 20 public choirs have been controlled by religious artists. According to The Korea Herald, the Jogye Order was also unhappy with President Moon Jae-October in’s visit with Pope Francis.

According to the census, the majority of Koreans are not religious.

According to the Korea Times, 56.1 percent of Koreans do not consider themselves religious, according to the 2015 census. The census revealed that the nation had 9.68 million Protestants, 7.62 million Buddhists, and 3.89 million Catholics, according to the newspaper. According to the Telegraph, South Korea has a population of over 52 million people.

DISCLAIMER: ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED

Watch This Video-

  • does buddhism have a god
  • is buddhism a religion
  • how to become a buddhist
You May Also Like

Ukraine’s President, Left Out of U.S.

Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko was left out of a meeting with U.S.…

Bidenomics Takes Root in Europe’s Economically Fragile South

Called “Bidenomics” by some, after the U.S. vice president who helped create…

Mark Allen: Northern Irishman ‘can’t rule out’ having to withdraw from UK Championship

Northern Irishman Mark Allen has said he can’t rule out having to…

MLB umpire Joe West has never missed a call. Just ask him

The role of the MLB umpire has changed over time, from a…