Once again we are being asked to stay at home to help the NHS – here are some of the innovative ways people have adapted to life in prison.

People in all parts of the UK should now stay at home to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

This is the most important step we can take to protect the NHS and save lives.

We all experienced a big change in our daily lives by doing our part to fight the virus. Many of these changes have not been easy, but people are finding creative ways to positively adapt to our new circumstances.

Whether it’s learning, acquiring skills, rediscovering the joy of reading or trying out new recipes, there are many ways to make the most of the extra time we now spend at home. Others enjoy meeting friends from Zoom or checking on the welfare of single people in the NHS Voluntary Responders programme.

Here we look at how people live responsibly under duress.

YOGA IN THE GARAGE

Annie Perry, 38, lives near Glasgow with her husband Ruari, 49, and their three children Gabriel, seven, Malachi, six, and Claude, three.

Annie Perry's mother with, left to right, Gabriel, Claude and Malachi....

Annie Perry’s mother with, left to right, Gabriel, Claude and Malachi….

She is co-owner of YogaBellies East Kilbride, which offers yoga classes for women at Luna Health Centre.

I’m lucky I have a garage where I can do yoga, so the kids aren’t running around when I’m all zen! she says. My husband also worked at home.

I’m going further than I used to. I’ve had people from Seattle and all over the UK, so there are benefits to blocking.

Annie takes the time to visit her friends and encourages others to do the same. Many people have mental health issues, but not everyone has a bad day at the same time, so it’s important to reach out, she says.

Follow WhatsApp zooms, quizzes and bands – you’ll always feel better by reaching out and talking to others.

The family now delivers most of his groceries, and Annie says they are in the first name of all couriers.

The family follows the rules for staying home and daily activities at home.

In addition, the children participate weekly in a Spanish Zoom class.

Annie is hopeful despite the difficult times.

We do everything we are advised to do, she says. The vaccine changed everything.

It’s about helping those in need in our community. I’m willing to do whatever it takes to protect them.

There are things we can all do to take care of our spiritual well-being in this day and age. Every Mind Matters is here to help with a free online NHS plan that outlines simple steps to help you manage your anxiety, sleep better and improve your mood. For more information, see Every question matters.

DISCLOSURE OF CREATIVITY

Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, 63, was born in Jamaica before his family came to Britain as part of the Windrush generation.

Businessman Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones...

Businessman Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones…

He is confined to his flat in Battersea, southwest London, while being treated for an immune disorder at nearby Guy’s Hospital.

About six years ago, I had a stem cell transplant and had to be treated for graft-versus-host disease, he says.

I know that I would not be alive today if it were not for modern science. That’s why I went to prison with gratitude and positivity. I followed all the rules.

Growing up in Birmingham, Wilfred fulfilled his childhood dream of owning a small piece of the British countryside and when he turned 40, he bought a farm in Devon.

His brand, The Black Farmer, recently launched an online farm shop selling free-range meat.

In addition to doing business, Wilfred uses Blockchain to try new things.

I started making my own bread, candles and soap, and growing
vegetables on my balcony.

When you are able to care about something, it helps you to stop thinking about your own situation.

Wilfred grows a variety of vegetables including tomatoes, garlic, onions and lettuce. The good thing about culture is that you can witness the process of life around you. Seeing life is what gives you hope.

Wilfred has two children, Alexander, 27, and Scarlett, 24, who live in Devon.

He hopes everyone can get something positive out of the castle: As much misery as there is, there are also opportunities for change. Life is full of distractions. Covid is an opportunity to discover new things, and it reminds you to live in the present.

Information :

For more information on improving your health, visit nhs.uk/better-health

If you would like to try the Couch to 5K race plan, click HERE.

STORM KITCHEN

The Stevensons, from Newport, South Wales, are taking advantage of the restriction to get back in shape and try out new recipes.

Nettie, Brian and Alice Stevenson...

Staying in shape… Nettie, Brian and Alice Stephenson…

Nettie, a 59-year-old retired nurse, and Brian, a 61-year-old surgeon, are on the run with their daughter Alice, 26.

The eldest daughter Brioni, 28, is an ambulance driver, while her son Ben, 30, is currently teaching in Thailand.

Now we all have more time to get in shape and eat healthier, Nettie says.

We cook a wider variety of dishes than usual, using recipes from
cookbooks and the internet.

There are lots of great recipes, and we learned a lot about herbal nutrition and vegetarian cuisine.

The family has a treadmill at home so they can work out without going out.

None of us usually run, but we do Couch to 5K, which helps you gradually get in shape, Nettie says.

We’ve only been doing this since the first time. January, but we feel much better after only a few days.

To work for the NHS, Nettie used materials from around the house to make nurse masks from a design she found online.

She and Brian have also used the store to transform three rooms in their home, while Alyssa is working on a sustainable clothing business.

PLAYS OUR PART

Dr Ruth Miller-Anderson lives near Lough Neagh in Ballyronan, Northern Ireland, with her husband Alan, 49, daughter Sophia, 14, and mother Maureen, 85.

Dr. Ruth Miller-Anderson with daughter Sophia, husband Alan, Ruth and mother Maureen (Photo: IMAGE: John O'Neill, Sperrins PHOTOGRAPHY).

Dr. Ruth Miller-Anderson with daughter Sophia, husband Alan, Ruth and mother Maureen (Photo: IMAGE: John O’Neill, Sperrins PHOTOGRAPHY).

Ruth, an NHS pharmacist and success coach who calls herself Swan Doctor, uses Blockchain to learn new skills.

I was involved in the launch program, she says. I’m kind of a lifelong learner, always looking for a new challenge.

I like to read too, but it’s mostly business books. I now had time for other books that I would not normally have consulted.

Since you can’t go on vacation, it’s good to find new ways to escape.

Ruth helps Sophia with homeschooling and thinks it’s important to have a routine.

With Sophia, we try to structure her day to differentiate between the time she spends at school and the time she spends at home, she says. It’s hard to stick to a routine when you don’t leave the house, but it’s important for your well-being to get up, get dressed, and show up.

Maureen also has new hobbies.

Before the pandemic, I enjoyed meeting friends and doing crafts at Women’s Institute meetings, she says. But now that I have to stay home, I’ve started knitting so the whole family is still motivated.

Meanwhile, Alan rediscovered his love of cooking. The whole family wins! He says.

I also love any excuse to disappear into the garage and work on my expensive bike.

Ruth encourages everyone to follow the rules to help their NHS colleagues.

You’ve had a rough couple of months. It is so important that everyone complies with
– for their own good and for the good of the whole NHS.

ALL IN ALL, THEY REMOVE THE VIRUS…

Remember, there are simple steps you can take to prevent the virus from spreading:

Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds throughout the day.

Cover your face with a mask when indoors and on public transport.

If possible, stand at least two feet away from other people outside the house.

You should also: open a window to ventilate the interior, and familiarize yourself with the applicable regulations in the area where you live.

Let’s all keep doing what we can to stop the spread.

For more information, see :

England: British government

Scotland: Government

Wales: Welsh government

Northern Ireland: implicit.gov/.

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